Six O’Clock: The Beauty Hour

2018 Feb 22nd

Late afternoon is a great time of day for great many things. It has a major social significance, and it is the hour when most employed individuals switch gears between two dimensions of their lives: work and family. Work comes in many different forms and shapes nowadays, and so do families, including those of one. It is essentially a change in dynamic that is welcomed mentally and physically however much it may resemble routine. In terms of skin care, 6 o’clock is an opportunity not to be missed.

Skin undergoes and endures major offensives during the day, even within the most ordinary and uneventful lives. It is the barrier, in the most literal sense, against which the visible and invisible influences of the environment crash constantly. It is on the periphery of a hyperactive universe that is the human body. It is large, soft, durable, delicate, and can use a little help.

That a small amount of a cream, or a serum, that gets applied to the face regularly can actually produce visible results, is one of the enduring mysteries of both beauty and science. The typical regimen involves morning routine and the evening routine; introducing the 6 o’clock beauty blitz is skin care made better.

The logic behind it is fairly simple: exposure to pollutants, UV rays, internal stress, weather conditions, can and will initiate detrimental processes in the skin that don’t end when we leave the office, get a drink with friends, or let the steam out at the gym. In a practical sense: a good, thorough cleanse should not wait for bedtime. Makeup worn for 10 hours, the moisturizer with sun protection that is well past its useful period, dust and other more or less grimy particles, plus skin’s own excretions, need to be removed at the first convenient opportunity. And the best time for it is that fine hour when we take back the day.

Follow the cleansing step with Hyaluronic Acid Serum and Antioxidant Serum for skin in the nude, and renewed.

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